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Book Review: The Dragon Republic by R. F. Kuang

Book Review: The Dragon Republic by R. F. KuangThe Dragon Republic by R F Kuang
Series: The Poppy War #3
Genre: Fantasy
Release Date: 8th August 2019
Publisher: Harper Voyager
Source: Borrowed, Publisher
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: five-stars
In the aftermath of the Third Poppy War, shaman and warrior Rin is on the run: haunted by the atrocity she committed to end the war, addicted to opium, and hiding from the murderous commands of her vengeful god, the fiery Phoenix. Her only reason for living is to get revenge on the traitorous Empress who sold out Nikan to their enemies.</br></br>

With no other options, Rin joins forces with the powerful Dragon Warlord, who has a plan to conquer Nikan, unseat the Empress, and create a new Republic. Rin throws herself into his war. After all, making war is all she knows how to do.</br></br>

But the Empress is a more powerful foe than she appears, and the Dragon Warlord’s motivations are not as democratic as they seem. The more Rin learns, the more she fears her love for Nikan will drive her away from every ally and lead her to rely more and more on the Phoenix’s deadly power. Because there is nothing she won’t sacrifice for her country and her vengeance.

I don’t even know where to start with this review. I put off reading The Dragon Republic for almost a year. A YEAR. I adored The Poppy War and after THAT. ENDING. I knew I had to be in the right headspace for the sequel. So I waited, and waited, and waited. Then I finally though screw it, and picked The Dragon Republic up and never looked back.

Rin is still going through a lot of crap. After the way The Poppy War ended, I wasn’t too sure what to think or expect of her character. She did some awful things, and I think it takes a very talented writer to pull off a character in such a way that Kuang did. Honestly, Rin’s character development (or, sometimes, lack thereof) is done wonderously and it makes so much sense. She has grown in lots of ways, but in others she’s still the same ol’ Rin, leaving lots of room for her to continue to grow and work on her sh*t in the final book in the trilogy.

I do have a bone to pick with Kuang, though, because she completely destroyed my ship. Like, blew it out of the harbour. I’m mad and angry and super sad. And yet I’m still clinging onto the fact that it might resurface somewhat in the third book. PLEASE GIVE ME THIS.

In all seriousness, the only issue I have with this series so far is that Rin has, like, no female friends. All her close friends are guys, and she often shuts out female characters and looks down on them and belittles them. I really hope that this is addressed and tackled in the third book, as I think it’s the only downfall of the series for me. I don’t want to read about a badass main character if they don’t have any badass female friends! GIVE ME FEMALE FRIENDSHIPS, DAMMIT.

Read the book. That is all I wish to say on the matter.

Book Review: Tweet Cute by Emma Lord

Book Review: Tweet Cute by Emma LordTweet Cute by Emma Lord
Genre: Contemporary
Release Date: 21st January 2020
Publisher: Macmillan
Source: Borrowed
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Meet Pepper, swim team captain, chronic overachiever, and all-around perfectionist. Her family may be falling apart, but their massive fast-food chain is booming ― mainly thanks to Pepper, who is barely managing to juggle real life while secretly running Big League Burger’s massive Twitter account.

Enter Jack, class clown and constant thorn in Pepper’s side. When he isn’t trying to duck out of his obscenely popular twin’s shadow, he’s busy working in his family’s deli. His relationship with the business that holds his future might be love/hate, but when Big League Burger steals his grandma’s iconic grilled cheese recipe, he’ll do whatever it takes to take them down, one tweet at a time.

All’s fair in love and cheese ― that is, until Pepper and Jack’s spat turns into a viral Twitter war. Little do they know, while they’re publicly duking it out with snarky memes and retweet battles, they’re also falling for each other in real life ― on an anonymous chat app Jack built.

As their relationship deepens and their online shenanigans escalate ― people on the internet are shipping them?? ― their battle gets more and more personal, until even these two rivals can’t ignore they were destined for the most unexpected, awkward, all-the-feels romance that neither of them expected.
 

Tweet Cute was just as adorable as I thought it would be. It was one of my most anticipated releases of the year, and I was loving how much hype it was getting as a debut, so I couldn’t wait to get my hands on it once it was released. It met my expectations perfectly, and I’m so glad that I nabbed it as soon as it came out.

I went into this ready for a sweet YA romance, and that’s exactly what I got. I really have to be in the right frame of mind for romance in YA because sometimes it gets a bit silly and the author doesn’t manage to pull it off, but the hate-to-love romance in this and the secret Twitter war was well crafted and I ended up really liking the main pairing.

I can’t not mention the food descriptions because OH MY GOD it was beautiful. Not only do the characters go on and on about grilled cheese, Pepper is a baker and makes the most beautiful sounding concoctions. Please bear in mind that I read this during No Sugar January, so I was pretty much DYING while I was reading this because I wanted ALL OF THE FOOD. I’m thinking about doing a vlog in which I talk about the book and also bake a few of the things mentioned because that’s how much I loved the food in this.

Like I said, Tweet Cute met all of my expectations and I’d highly recommend it to you if you’re looking for a fluffy romance based around a viral Twitter war. I think people on Book Twitter will find it quite relatable. Overall, a solid debut!

American Panda by Gloria Chao

American Panda by Gloria ChaoAmerican Panda by Gloria Chao
Genre: Contemporary
Release Date: 6th February 2018
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Source: Borrowed
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

At seventeen, Mei should be in high school, but skipping fourth grade was part of her parents' master plan. Now a freshman at MIT, she is on track to fulfill the rest of this predetermined future: become a doctor, marry a preapproved Taiwanese Ivy Leaguer, produce a litter of babies.

With everything her parents have sacrificed to make her cushy life a reality, Mei can't bring herself to tell them the truth--that she (1) hates germs, (2) falls asleep in biology lectures, and (3) has a crush on her classmate Darren Takahashi, who is decidedly not Taiwanese.

But when Mei reconnects with her brother, Xing, who is estranged from the family for dating the wrong woman, Mei starts to wonder if all the secrets are truly worth it. Can she find a way to be herself, whoever that is, before her web of lies unravels?

American Panda was a pretty solid debut. It was high on everyone’s most anticipated lists because it’s about a Taiwanese-American teenager who goes to college and tries to balance life, family, and two different cultures. I really enjoyed it, and I’d be interested in seeing what Chao comes out with next.

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Anatomy of a Scandal by Sarah Vaughan

Anatomy of a Scandal by Sarah VaughanAnatomy of a Scandal by Sarah Vaughan
Genre: Contemporary
Release Date: 23rd January 2018
Publisher: Atria
Source: Borrowed
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Sophie’s husband James is a loving father, a handsome man, a charismatic and successful public figure. And yet he stands accused of a terrible crime. Sophie is convinced he is innocent and desperate to protect her precious family from the lies that threaten to rip them apart.

Kate is the lawyer hired to prosecute the case: an experienced professional who knows that the law is all about winning the argument. And yet Kate seeks the truth at all times. She is certain James is guilty and is determined he will pay for his crimes.

Who is right about James? Sophie or Kate? And is either of them informed by anything more than instinct and personal experience? Despite her privileged upbringing, Sophie is well aware that her beautiful life is not inviolable. She has known it since she and James were first lovers, at Oxford, and she witnessed how easily pleasure could tip into tragedy.

Most people would prefer not to try to understand what passes between a man and a woman when they are alone: alone in bed, alone in an embrace, alone in an elevator… Or alone in the moonlit courtyard of an Oxford college, where a girl once stood before a boy, heart pounding with excitement, then fear. Sophie never understood why her tutorial partner Holly left Oxford so abruptly. What would she think, if she knew the truth?

I wouldn’t say Anatomy of a Scandal is entirely worth the hype, but it’s certainly entertaining and well worth a read. It’s an incredibly interesting courtroom drama that kept me reading.

I liked the different perspectives in this book. Multiple points of view don’t always work for me, but reading from the different characters’ perspectives was a really good insight into various characters and their feelings and behaviours.

The ending was a bit disappointing because something came about at the very end, leaving no room for resolution. I’m not a fan of open endings, even if the main plot has been resolved.

I wouldn’t describe Anatomy of a Scandal as a thriller, as it’s more of a quiet drama, but I enjoyed it nonetheless.

The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

The Woman in the Window by A.J. FinnThe Woman in the Window by A. J. Finn
Genre: Thriller
Release Date: 2nd January 2018
Publisher: William Morrow
Source: Borrowed
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Anna Fox lives alone, a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times--and spying on her neighbors.

Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, and their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble—and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller, no one—and nothing—is what it seems.

As psychological thrillers go, The Woman in the Window is an intriguing one, but it’s not all that original. I feel like I’ve read most of these plot points before in various other books, and nothing really stood out here.

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