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The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner by Khaled HosseiniThe Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
Genre: Historical
Release Date: 29th May 2003
Publisher: Riverhead Books
Source: Bought
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: five-stars

Amir is the son of a wealthy Kabul merchant, a member of the ruling caste of Pashtuns. Hassan, his servant and constant companion, is a Hazara, a despised and impoverished caste. Their uncommon bond is torn by Amir's choice to abandon his friend amidst the increasing ethnic, religious, and political tensions of the dying years of the Afghan monarchy, wrenching them far apart. But so strong is the bond between the two boys that Amir journeys back to a distant world, to try to right past wrongs against the only true friend he ever had.

The unforgettable, heartbreaking story of the unlikely friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father’s servant, The Kite Runner is a beautifully crafted novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. It is about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, and the possibility of redemption; and an exploration of the power of fathers over sons—their love, their sacrifices, their lies.

A sweeping story of family, love, and friendship told against the devastating backdrop of the history of Afghanistan over the last thirty years, The Kite Runner is an unusual and powerful novel that has become a beloved, one-of-a-kind classic.

I read the graphic novel of The Kite Runner about seven years ago when I first started blogging and I absolutely loved it. I immediately bought the novel, but I put off reading it for the longest time (seven years…) because I felt like the story was still too fresh in my mind and I remembered absolutely bawling over the graphic novel.

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The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train by Paula HawkinsThe Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Genre: Thriller
Release Date: January 13, 2015
Publisher: Riverhead Books
Source: Bought
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

As someone who doesn’t read the blurbs of books before going into them, I am happy to say that my way is the best way to experience The Girl on the Train. I knew next to nothing about the book before I read it, and it meant that I was able to enjoy the book and suspect absolutely everyone, as well as having no clue as to what was going to happen next. Some people have mentioned that the blurb does help you narrow down who the culprit(s) could be, so you have been warned. Continue reading