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The Light at the Bottom of the World by London Shah

The Light at the Bottom of the World by London ShahThe Light at the Bottom of the World by London Shah
Series:
Genre: Post Apocalyptic
Release Date: 29th October 2019
Publisher: Disney Hyperion
Source: Publisher
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: two-stars

At the end of the twenty-first century, the world has changed dramatically, but life continues one thousand feet below the ocean's surface. In Great Britain, sea creatures swim among the ruins of Big Ben and the Tower of London, and citizens waver between fear and hope; fear of what lurks in the abyss, and hope that humanity will soon discover a way to reclaim the Earth.

Meanwhile, sixteen-year-old Leyla McQueen has her own problems to deal with. Her father's been arrested, accused of taking advantage of victims of the Seasickness-a debilitating malaise that consumes people,often claiming their lives. But Leyla knows he's innocent, and all she's interested in is getting him back so that their lives can return to normal.

When she's picked to race in the action-packed London Submersible Marathon, Leyla gets the chance to secure his freedom; the Prime Minister promises the champion whatever their heart desires. The race takes an unexpected turn, though, and presents her with an opportunity she never wanted: Leyla must venture outside of London for the first time in her life, to find and rescue her father herself.

Now, she'll have to brave the unfathomable waters and defy a corrupt government determined to keep its secrets, all the while dealing with a secretive, hotheaded companion she never asked for in the first place. If she fails, or falls prey to her own fears, she risks capture–and her father might be lost forever.

I am soooo disappointed with The Light at the Bottom of the World! I adore apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic fiction, and with the current Climate Crisis, this book should have been exciting and topical and basically just something I would love. Unfortunately, my only take away from this book is that it is SUCH a boring book.

The setting of underwater London had so much potential, and I was very excited to dive in (lol) to this world and see how the country had changed. Unfortunately, there wasn’t enough description, and the characters just flitted from one place to another without really talking about it. I didn’t get a feel for the setting at all, and to be honest I got a bit confused about exactly where everyone was.

The characters also had ideas that came out of nowhere, with no build up or suspense, and it was as though I, as the reader, was supposed to be following along the whole time. Except I was unable to follow along because the writing was so chaotic and disjointed.

In addition to all of that, nothing really happened, and for some reason the story has been dragged into a duology. I feel like this could have been a strong standalone if the writing had been tightened up, but The Light at the Bottom of the World ended up being a whole lot of missed potential.

Drop by Drop by Morgan Llywelyn

Drop by Drop by Morgan LlywelynDrop by Drop by Morgan Llywelyn
Series: Drop by Drop #1
Genre: Post Apocalyptic
Release Date: 26th June 2018
Publisher: Tor
Source: Publisher
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: one-half-stars

In this first book in the Step By Step trilogy, global catastrophe occurs as all plastic mysteriously liquefies. All the small components making many technologies possible―Navigation systems, communications, medical equipment―fail.

In Sycamore River, citizens find their lives disrupted as everything they've depended on melts around them, with sometimes fatal results. All they can rely upon is themselves.

And this is only the beginning . . .

To be completely honest with you, this book was shit. I am so disappointed because the premise had such promise. A world in which all the plastic starts to melt? Yaaaassss. Computers would break down. Cars would fall apart. There would be no more television or phones, and if you didn’t have a completely metal radio you’d be screwed. But instead of focusing on society breaking down and something actually exciting, the author chose to focus on a small town that could no longer use pens.

Everything about this book disappointed me. I’m a huge fan of the apocalyptic genre and I thought this was going to be great. Unfortunately, it was boring, somewhat underdeveloped, and the characters were dull and unlikeable. I obviously won’t be carrying on with the series.

 

Mini Review: The Road by Cormac McCarthy

Mini Review: The Road by Cormac McCarthyThe Road by Cormac McCarthy
Genre: Post Apocalyptic
Release Date: May 4, 2007
Publisher: Picador
Source: Bought
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: one-star

A father and his son walk alone through burned America, heading through the ravaged landscape to the coast. This is the profoundly moving story of their journey. The Road boldly imagines a future in which no hope remains, but in which two people, 'each the other's world entire', are sustained by love. Awesome in the totality of its vision, it is an unflinching meditation on the worst and the best that we are capable of: ultimate destructiveness, desperate tenacity, and the tenderness that keeps two people alive in the face of total devastation.

Since this is a mini review, you might be able to guess how I felt about The Road. I tend to have no problem reviewing books that I loved, and also books that I was enraged by, but books that were so boring that I wanted to tear my eyes out are so difficult to review.

The Road is a post-apocalyptic novel, and it’s really highly rated. Really, really highly. Whenever there’s a list of post-apocalyptic books you HAVE to read, The Road is pretty much always in the top three. It’s about a father and his son who cross the United States (I can’t remember where they were going, but whatever. USA) that has been torn apart by the apocalypse. While they’re travelling down this Road (capital R for emphasis), they get into a lot of trouble and it’s all pretty dark and bleak. Continue reading

The Water Knife by Paolo Bacigalupi

The Water Knife by Paolo BacigalupiThe Water Knife by Paolo Bacigalupi
Genre: Post Apocalyptic
Release Date: 26th May 2015
Publisher: Brown Book Group UK
Source: Publisher
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

In the American Southwest, Nevada, Arizona, and California skirmish for dwindling shares of the Colorado River. Into the fray steps Angel Velasquez, detective, leg-breaker, assassin and spy. A Las Vegas water knife, Angel "cuts" water for his boss, Catherine Case, ensuring that her lush, luxurious arcology developments can bloom in the desert, so the rich can stay wet, while the poor get nothing but dust. When rumors of a game-changing water source surface in drought-ravaged Phoenix, Angel is sent to investigate. There, he encounters Lucy Monroe, a hardened journalist with no love for Vegas and every reason to hate Angel, and Maria Villarosa, a young Texas refugee who survives by her wits and street smarts in a city that despises everything that she represents.  With bodies piling up, bullets flying, and Phoenix teetering on collapse, it seems like California is making a power play to monopolize the life-giving flow of a river. For Angel, Lucy, and Maria time is running out and their only hope for survival rests in each other’s hands. But when water is more valuable than gold, alliances shift like sand, and the only thing for certain is that someone will have to bleed if anyone hopes to drink.

The Water Knife presents a grim image of a world in which water, necessary for life to exist, has become a commodity needed by many and owned by few. The world that Bacigalupi paints such a vivid image of is one in which people are being forced to live in vast, poverty stricken deserts; they are dependent on the few private companies and government organisations left to provide them with water. The United States of America no longer exists; instead, the US has split off into several ‘states’ that run more like private companies. California exists as the most powerful of these new states, and Texas, with no water of its own, is unable to sustain life – refugees from the state of Texas are considered to be lower-class citizens. If this is all sounding familiar, it should be. The real world parallels are on point throughout the book.

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Stranger by Rachel Manija Brown & Sherwood Smith

Stranger by Rachel Manija Brown & Sherwood SmithStranger by Rachel Manija Brown, Sherwood Smith
Series: The Change #1
Genre: Post Apocalyptic
Release Date: 11th November, 2014
Publisher: Viking Juvenile
Source: Author
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Many generations ago, a mysterious cataclysm struck the world. Governments collapsed and people scattered, to rebuild where they could. A mutation, "the Change,” arose, granting some people unique powers. Though the area once called Los Angeles retains its cultural diversity, its technological marvels have faded into legend. "Las Anclas" now resembles a Wild West frontier town… where the Sheriff possesses superhuman strength, the doctor can warp time to heal his patients, and the distant ruins of an ancient city bristle with deadly crystalline trees that take their jewel-like colors from the clothes of the people they killed.

Teenage prospector Ross Juarez’s best find ever – an ancient book he doesn’t know how to read – nearly costs him his life when a bounty hunter is set on him to kill him and steal the book. Ross barely makes it to Las Anclas, bringing with him a precious artifact, a power no one has ever had before, and a whole lot of trouble.

I was actually pretty pleasantly surprised by this book. With review copies it’s always a bit of a leap of faith, so it was nice to be reading this story and enjoying it, because I honestly wasn’t sure I would.

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