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The Power by Naomi Alderman

The Power by Naomi AldermanThe Power by Naomi Alderman
Genre: Science Fiction
Release Date: 27th October 2016
Publisher: Viking
Source: Bought
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: two-half-stars

In The Power the world is a recognisable place: there's a rich Nigerian kid who larks around the family pool; a foster girl whose religious parents hide their true nature; a local American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But something vital has changed, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power - they can cause agonising pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world changes utterly.

This extraordinary novel by Naomi Alderman, a Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year and Granta Best of British writer, is not only a gripping story of how the world would change if power was in the hands of women but also exposes, with breath-taking daring, our contemporary world.

Well, this was a bit boring. I’m massively disappointed in The Power because I picked it up after Alderman won a tonne of awards, including the Bailey’s prize, and I thought it was going to be a modern classic. I was expecting something epic.

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The Unquiet by Mikaela Everett

The Unquiet by Mikaela EverettThe Unquiet by Mikaela Everett
Genre: Science Fiction
Release Date: 22nd September 2015
Publisher: Greenwillow
Source: Publisher
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: two-stars

For most of her life, Lirael has been training to kill—and replace—a duplicate version of herself on a parallel Earth. She is the perfect sleeper-soldier. But she’s beginning to suspect she is not a good person.

The two Earths are identical in almost every way. Two copies of every city, every building, even every person. But the people from the second Earth know something their duplicates do not—two versions of the same thing cannot exist. They—and their whole planet—are slowly disappearing. Lira has been trained mercilessly since childhood to learn everything she can about her duplicate, to be a ruthless sleeper-assassin who kills that other Lirael and steps seamlessly into her life.

This was a weird book, man. Has anyone played Final Fantasy XIII? Remember that thing with the two planets? Yeah, The Unquiet is like that.

weird

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Winter by Marissa Meyer

Winter by Marissa MeyerWinter by Marissa Meyer
Series: The Lunar Chronicles #4
Genre: Science Fiction
Release Date: November 10, 2015
Publisher: Feiwel & Friends
Source: Bought
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Princess Winter is admired by the Lunar people for her grace and kindness, and despite the scars that mar her face, her beauty is said to be even more breathtaking than that of her stepmother, Queen Levana.

Winter despises her stepmother, and knows Levana won’t approve of her feelings for her childhood friend—the handsome palace guard, Jacin. But Winter isn’t as weak as Levana believes her to be and she’s been undermining her stepmother’s wishes for years. Together with the cyborg mechanic, Cinder, and her allies, Winter might even have the power to launch a revolution and win a war that’s been raging for far too long.

Can Cinder, Scarlet, Cress, and Winter defeat Levana and find their happily ever afters?

For a series ender, Winter was actually pretty good! I rarely love series finales because I tend to have such high hopes and then they fall flat. Winter, however, was good. Not amazing, but still. I’ll take what I can get.

First thing’s first, Winter is our new heroine and she’s black. YES TO DIVERSITY AND AWESOMENESS. This goes to show that excuses such as “(S)he’s white in the original and so (s)he has to be white in this remake!” are a load of bollocks. Don’t even try. Continue reading

Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay KristoffIlluminae by Amie Kaufman, Jay Kristoff
Series: The Illuminae Files#1
Genre: Science Fiction
Release Date: October 20, 2015
Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
Source: Bought
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: three-stars
<p style="text-align: justify">This morning, Kady thought breaking up with Ezra was the hardest thing she’d have to do.<br /><br />This afternoon, her planet was invaded.<br /><br />The year is 2575, and two rival megacorporations are at war over a planet that’s little more than an ice-covered speck at the edge of the universe. Too bad nobody thought to warn the people living on it. With enemy fire raining down on them, Kady and Ezra—who are barely even talking to each other—are forced to fight their way onto an evacuating fleet, with an enemy warship in hot pursuit.<br /><br />But their problems are just getting started. A deadly plague has broken out and is mutating, with terrifying results; the fleet's AI, which should be protecting them, may actually be their enemy; and nobody in charge will say what’s really going on. As Kady hacks into a tangled web of data to find the truth, it's clear only one person can help her bring it all to light: the ex-boyfriend she <em>swore</em> she'd never speak to again.</p>

Illuminae is probably one of the most hyped up releases of 2015, and I can’t really figure out why. Neither author’s previous works are that big, and the book itself really isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Maybe I need to be enlightened. But I found the entire thing to be incredibly average and just simply “good”. There are little other ways to describe it. Continue reading

The Alex Crow by Andrew Smith

The Alex Crow by Andrew SmithThe Alex Crow by Andrew Smith
Genre: Science Fiction
Release Date: 5th March 2015
Publisher: Electric Monkey
Source: Publisher
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: four-half-stars

Once again blending multiple story strands that transcend time and place, Grasshopper Jungle author Andrew Smith tells the story of 15-year-old Ariel, a refugee from the Middle East who is the sole survivor of an attack on his small village. Now living with an adoptive family in Sunday, West Virginia, Ariel's story of his summer at a boys' camp for tech detox is juxtaposed against those of a schizophrenic bomber and the diaries of a failed arctic expedition from the late nineteenth century. Oh, and there’s also a depressed bionic reincarnated crow.

The Alex Crow is a fantastically weird and fun book that still managed to make me cry several times. I mean, that’s not hard to do considering I once cried at a Lloyds TSB advert but the point still stands; Andrew Smith is really good at making the reader cry even while laughing. Continue reading