The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee

The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGeeThe Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee
Series: The Thousandth Floor #1
Genre: Science Fiction
Release Date: 30th August 2016
Publisher: HarperCollins
Source: Publisher
Add it: Goodreads
Rating: two-stars

NEW YORK CITY AS YOU'VE NEVER SEEN IT BEFORE.

A thousand-story tower stretching into the sky. A glittering vision of the future where anything is possible—if you want it enough.

WELCOME TO MANHATTAN, 2118.

A hundred years in the future, New York is a city of innovation and dreams. Everyone there wants something…and everyone has something to lose.

LEDA COLE’s flawless exterior belies a secret addiction—to a drug she never should have tried and a boy she never should have touched.

ERIS DODD-RADSON’s beautiful, carefree life falls to pieces when a heartbreaking betrayal tears her family apart.

RYLIN MYERS’s job on one of the highest floors sweeps her into a world—and a romance—she never imagined…but will this new life cost Rylin her old one?

WATT BAKRADI is a tech genius with a secret: he knows everything about everyone. But when he’s hired to spy for an upper-floor girl, he finds himself caught up in a complicated web of lies.

And living above everyone else on the thousandth floor is AVERY FULLER, the girl genetically designed to be perfect. The girl who seems to have it all—yet is tormented by the one thing she can never have.

Amid breathtaking advancement and high-tech luxury, five teenagers struggle to find their place at the top of the world. But when you're this high up, there's nowhere to go but down....

I was not expecting this book to be quite so Teen Drama! It gave off a lot of Gossip Girl vibes that I was totally unprepared for. Not sure why. I guess I was expecting it to be more of a thriller or mystery with some Rich People Drama thrown in? Instead it was just a lot of gossiping and partying.

I really enjoyed the concept of having this massive tower that everyone in Manhattan now lives in, and it being divided by class. The important people live nearer the top, with the less well off people living further down. Such an interesting idea. I was all for that.

What I didn’t like, however, was the characters. I didn’t connect with any of them, and I have to say that one of them kind of repulsed me. So Avery, the super rich girl, is in love with her brother. He’s adopted, but they had been raised together as siblings, and the entire thing was icky. I am not always repulsed by incest in fiction (although I by no means ship it), but in this case I really didn’t like it. I feel like if he had been adopted as a teenager it would have been better, as they wouldn’t have felt like real siblings, ya know?

There are five different points of view in this book, and none of them really stuck out to me. Avery did, mostly because of the brother/sister thing, and I guess Watt was kind of interesting as he had a super computer embedded in his head, but other than that I can’t remember much about any of them.

I’m not going to read the sequel, but if anyone wants to tell me what happens in it then I will gladly listen!

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